Listening Questions


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Monologue - Preparing for a Marathon

Read each question carefully and choose the ONE best answer.
How long is a marathon?
26 metres
260 metres
26 kilometres
2.6 miles
26 miles
What happens to an individual's heart rate during exercise?
Rapidly increases
Steadily increases
Stays the same
Steadily decreases
Rapidly decreases
What happens to an individual's cardiac output during exercise?
Rapidly increases
Steadily increases
Stays the same
Steadily decreases
Rapidly decreases
What happens to an individual's ventilation rate during exercise?
Rapidly increases
Steadily increases
Stays the same
Steadily decreases
Rapidly decreases
Where is a greater oxygen supply required during exercise?
Bones
Brain
Skeletal muscle
Small intestines
Stomach
Read each question carefully and choose the correct answers. Please note that there is more than one correct answer for each question.
Which of the following factors involved in homeostasis are disturbed by exercise?
Energy balance
Fluid balance
Ionic balance
pH balance
Thermal balance
Which of the following are directly affected in response to exercise?
Central nervous system
Kidneys
Muscles
Reproductive organs
Skin
Which of the following physiological changes might an individual's body undergo during prolonged exercise?
Greater muscle mass
Greater fat storage
Reduced cardiac mass
Increased left ventricular volume
Greater proportion of fatigue-resistant fast-twitch muscle fibres
Complete each sentence with the correct ending.
During exercise, one's liver…
…increases its output of fructose via glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.
…increases its output of glucose via glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.
…increases its output of sucrose via glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.
…decreases its output of glucose via glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.
During exercise, one's adipose tissue…
….begins to break down to release fructose to provide energy for exercise.
…begins to break down to release glucose to provide energy for exercise.
…begins to break down to release glucose and sucrose to provide energy for exercise.
…begins to break down to release sucrose to provide energy for exercise.
Haemoglobin must be saturated with oxygen to ensure that….
…sufficient oxygen is delivered to respiring tissues for metabolism.
…insufficient oxygen is delivered to respiring tissues for metabolism.
…sufficient carbon dioxide is delivered to respiring tissues for metabolism.
…insufficient carbon dioxide is delivered to respiring tissues for metabolism.
VO2 max is a measurement of…
…one's maximum aerobic capacity; the smaller it is, the greater one's endurance potential.
…one's maximum aerobic capacity; the greater it is, the greater one's endurance potential.
…one's minimum aerobic capacity; the greater it is, the greater one's endurance potential.
…one's minimum aerobic capacity; the smaller it is, the greater one's endurance potential.
The purpose of sweat is…
…to bring heat into the body when energy is required during exercise.
…to dissipate heat away from the body when energy is required during exercise.
…to bring heat into the body when energy is produced during exercise.
…to dissipate heat away from the body when energy is produced during exercise.
A greater uptake of oxygen is…
...required to meet the endocrinological demands of exercise.
…required to meet the inflammatory demands of exercise.
…required to meet the metabolic and endocrinological demands of exercise.
…required to meet the metabolic demands of exercise.
The following flow chart summarises the physiological changes which can occur when training at high altitudes. Complete the flow-chart using the words from the text. Write NO MORE THAN ONE WORD from the text in each gap.
Environment
Polycythaemia
Increased Blood Cell Count
Greater Uptake
Greater Oxygen Delivery to Tissues
Greater Blood
Greater Risk of: Blood Heart Attacks